Viewing the Falls, 1900’s part 4


The Park Board seems to have gotten the groundwater problem under control here, as the catchbasin is gone and the surface looks dry.  This rare look at the sides and edges shows just how gigantically inappropriate this viewing platform was.

Continue reading “Viewing the Falls, 1900’s part 4”

viewing the falls in the 1890’s, part 3

William G. Stafford worked out of 206 1/2 Central Ave. between 1893 and 1899. The card here was printed for that studio address, but there’s no guarantee that the photograph affixed to it is from that same time span.

Continue reading “viewing the falls in the 1890’s, part 3”

viewing the falls, 1900’s, part 3


“Danger, Do Not Go Beyond”

Here’s another nicely posed tourist at Minnehaha, on the Park Board’s large stone platform.  During the 1890’s, the Park Board also built the boulder wall that still exists today on the north side of the gorge.

Continue reading “viewing the falls, 1900’s, part 3”

viewing the falls, 1890’s, part 2

The beginnings of Park Board improvements at Minnehaha Park.

In 1889, the Minneapolis Park Board finally took control of Minnehaha Falls.  After years and years of legal fighting over this land (but with more lawsuits to come) the Park Board ultimately prevailed.

Continue reading “viewing the falls, 1890’s, part 2”

viewing the falls, 1890’s, part 1

These solid citizens commemorated their pleasant dat at Minnehaha Park with a photograph.
These solid citizens commemorated their visit to Minnehaha Park with a photograph.

This undated photo from some time in the 1890s shows a place to sit built into the edge of the park board platform.  That seating seems not to have lasted into the 20th century (see images in older posts, below).

Stone construction is hard, heavy work.  Probably this was rebuilt because of the basic instability of the site.


viewing the falls, 1900’s: part 2

Vandalism? Disrepair? Deterioration? Someone named Will Taylor poses before Minnehaha Falls.

This photo is was taken on June 11, 1904, and shows that the Park Board’s viewing platform wasn’t holding up as well as one might hope.  This looks like a combination of vandalism and deterioration, with groundwater probably playing a part in the crumbling edge.  The land where this platform was looks like this today:

Continue reading “viewing the falls, 1900’s: part 2”

viewing the Falls, 1900’s: part 1

From 1890 until perhaps 1920, one could nearly touch the falling water at Minnehaha Falls. We cannot get so close today.

We can’t get this view of Minnehaha Falls today.  After the Park Board took ownership of Falls, they built a huge stone platform just where the photographers used to have people pose.  Not everyone liked this behemoth.  Charles “Father of the Parks” Loring wrote:

Continue reading “viewing the Falls, 1900’s: part 1”